The Sartorialist - A Parody

Tuesday, April 26, 2011 10:05 AM By Stephen J Christophers



The shirt has a nice cut, sporting embroidered dragons to the front - a Chinese country Kitsch - at a cost of $10 from a sweatshop in Guangzhou, China. A high quality garment nonetheless. The trousers: made from a light canvas, aged over several years. Having been ripped and hand machined many times over the last twelve to eighteen months. We might possibly visualize a depth of character by deconstructed layering. With respects, my local machinist only fosters basic skills in the profession, adding to a sense of degradation out of apathy. That unintentionally deconstructed statement is given room to shine, with odd personality.

In this way they elude the label of "Kitsch" by pure necessity, and practicality, a must to be lived with/in rather than a pure lust for imitation. My heavy canvas bag is used to hide tech, Computer laptop and camera etc. Again, originating from China it's an iconic statement of adversity through time and space: layering depth, and personality to the look, while serving a practical use. Nevertheless, ongoing maintenance is also needed, with time consuming patch work that presents a naturally understated aesthetic to the complimentary rough urban colour palette.

To summarise: a calm and seriously intelligent look, confident while impoverished. A style that defines the well traveled homeless thirty-something intellectual in today's dumbed-down mainstream society. Airing just a touch of sophistication, practicality and arrogance. Utilizing, a soft tertiary colour palette, in combination with foot wear also past their used by date. This allows the colour, styling, and cut of the country black pin-strip shirt to not overly dominate. Adding with honesty, the message of contrasts between today's, financial inequality, spiritual abandonment, and the airing of social critique around which suburban decay has brought about an abundance of wisdom, to those whom knew it could never seriously culture a return on investment.

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