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Documentary: God is in The Neurons

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 4:01 PM By Stephen J Christophers

God is in The Neurons, It's believed to be - under some mystique - the work of Chiren Boumaaza: Not a standard resume, which I find all the more compelling: a gamer that goes by the handle 'Athene', one who is both liked and disliked by peers, and critics. Bias aside, and on face value, the movie 'God is in The Neurons', touches on some fundamental theories; if anything, those theories which are foremost, in current terms, drivers of today's advancements in technology, such as advanced physics and biology; the sciences and innovation of tomorrow - a good thing?

Personally, I relate, and also use similar, 'theories' - ideas if you will - in constructing articles here at 'Reflections Blog'. Although, I know little of "Athene’s Theory of Everything" and should therefore not speculate any further on its origins. I know even less about online gaming...

Notwithstanding,'God is in The Neurons' the movie, is captivating enough to those with a disposition towards scientific analysis, to spark relative interest. And for those of you who do appreciate the sciences in general, then 'God is in The Neurons' is a must see. It's as thought provoking as, 'What the Bleep do we Know? Down the Rabbit Hole" with a rather more formidable digital post production. And, if not as creative as 'Waking Life' touches on a similar narrative. It's informative. It's well researched. It offers complex theories room to breath under the light of general intellectual understanding.

If I must find some negative attributes: at times it's complicated theories are given real-world context although require background knowledge of relative aspects of the theories in question. It also lacks a cast of intellectual minds, those who can validate ideas in laymans context. Saying this, it offers, amongst the depth and detail, stunning visuals. It does indeed reflect general scientific theories and visualize them. If not generally validated by theorists, it should be respected as a thought provoking and well produced mini documentary.



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